Centre for the Study of the Art and Antiques Market

News

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD studentship in collaboration with The Bowes Museum

Creating The Bowes Museum: private collecting, public philanthropy and the art market in the public art museum in Britain and France 1830-1900

The School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds and The Bowes Museum are pleased to announce a funded studentship for doctoral research, awarded under the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Scheme.

The Bowes Museum is a world-leading museum of essentially French fine and decorative art from the period 1500-1870, housed in an extraordinary ‘French Chateau’ constructed 1869-76 and located in County Durham at Barnard Castle. The collections were assembled by John Bowes in Britain and France, starting in the 1830s, and consolidated later from the 1850s with his wife Josephine, as a private endeavour, before John and Josephine made a deliberate and self-conscious decision to reshape their collecting activities and establish a public art museum in the early 1860s.

This shift from ‘private’ to ‘public’ involved a range of cultural, social, economic and political dynamics as they recalibrated their collecting objectives and activities, together with their patronage of contemporary artists, moving from the assembly of objects primarily shaped by personal taste to more systematic and ‘public-spirited’ collecting. This shift from ‘private’ to ‘public’ involved an increasing engagement with the discourses of a nascent art history and the evolving structures of the art market.

The proposed research project offers a unique opportunity to investigate the development of a key private-public collection as it evolved within critical cultural dialogs between Britain and France in the middle decades of the 19th century. Set against ideas of the political economy grounded in competitive notions of ‘taste’ and the perceived role and function of public art museums, the project will explore the relationships between private collecting, the art market and the development of public museums in the 19th century.

This PhD research project will utilise previously unexplored archive materials now made available following a major £12 million capital investment programme at the Bowes. The archives at the Bowes include a remarkable collection of bills, dealers’ letters and auction catalogues and an extensive range of personal correspondence of John and Josephine Bowes on their collecting and patronage activities in Britain and France, as well as documents relating to the designs for the museum and its proposed organisation.

It is envisaged that the preliminary research activities will also underpin the development of an exhibition and interpretation material and publicity in celebration of the 125th anniversary of the opening of The Bowes Museum in 2017.

This studentship will be supervised by Dr Mark Westgarth, University of Leeds, and Dr Jane Whittaker and Dr Howard Coutts at The Bowes Museum. This full time studentship is funded for three and a half years at standard AHRC rates and will begin on 1 October 2016.

Informal enquires can be made by contacting Dr Mark Westgarth (m.w.westgarth@leeds.ac.uk) or Dr Jane Whittaker (jane.whittaker@thebowesmuseum.org.uk).

See the website of the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies for further information, including how to apply.

The closing date for applications is 5pm on 31 May 2016.

Interviews will be held on 13 June.

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Rising Stars 2016: Symposium

twitter23fe203Dr Mark Westgarth will give a talk at the Rising Stars 2016 Symposium at New Ashgate Gallery in Farnham on Friday 18 March, 10.30am to 3.45pm.

Organised by the University of the Creative Arts, this symposium has an exciting line up of speakers including Dr Mark Westgarth, University of Leeds, Jonathan Parsons, artist, writer and lecturer and Alison Branagan, author and visual arts consultant. They will discuss the arts market and PR and social media and the event will also include a workshop: ‘how to sell’ – essential presentation skills.

Mark Westgarth’s talk, The Price of Everything: 10 Observations on the Contemporary Art Market, considers the contemporary art market as a complex nexus of practices, activities and ideas. His talk directs attention to 10 key themes that have come to dominate the contemporary art market in recent years.

This event is free but booking is essential as places are limited. Call to book 01252 713208 or email: gallery@newashgate.org.uk

See the New Ashgate Gallery for more information.

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Perspectives on the Art Market Open Lecture Series No. XVII

The art dealer Stefano Bardini (1836- 1922) and the use of photography as a tool for marketing and self-promotion
Speaker: Dr Annalea Tunesi, Independent Scholar

Thursday 17 March 2016
12.30pm to 1.30pm
Baines Wing, Room SR 1.14

All welcome.

For further information on this lecture series please email Dr Mark Westgarth m.w.westgarth@leeds.ac.uk

Perspectives on the Art Market is organised by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds

Image: Photocard, Stefano Bardini, c.1900. Photographic Archive Bardini, Copyright Polo Museale Regionale della Toscana, Firenze.

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Antique Dealer project – Interactive Website

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The Antique Dealers Project Website

www.antiquetrade.leeds.ac.uk

The research project is seeking to draw attention to the changing nature of the antique trade over 100 years and once we have sufficient data, you will be able to investigate and, crucially, to visualise the trading the changes in the antique trade over time.

 

 

The website will enable you to:

* see and compare the concentrations of dealers in various parts of Britain over time – when, for example, did The Cotswolds become a key location for the trade, and when did that change?

* track the different ways in which various dealers have been described and classified over time, and when for example, did dealers in ‘Old English Furniture’ emerge, and when did that term fall out of fashion?

* read about the changing history of individual dealerships as they move location,change ownership, or change trading specialisms.

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Antique Dealer Project Conference

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Antique Dealer Project Conference 

April 14th and 15th, 2016
Temple Newsam House, Leeds

This two-day conference is an opportunity to hear about the AHRC funded 32 month research project focused on the history of the British Antique Trade in the 20th century. Click Here for the poster that includes programme and online booking.

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Lunch-Launch

Thank you to everyone that came along to the Centre ‘lunch-launch’ yesterday – it was great to see some many people interested in the art & antiques market, and thank you all for the feedback, ideas, and observations on the future of the Centre and proposed activities.

Thank you too to our student helpers on the day, Tabby and Chelsea.

More soon on the future activities for the Centre for the Study of the Art & Antiques Market soon!

Mark

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Centre Lunch-Launch 1st December

We are officially launching the new Centre for the Study of the Art & Antiques Market on TUESDAY 1st December at 1200pm-1.00pm in Michael Sadler Building, room LG19.  There will be an opportunity to hear about the development of the Centre and the associated archives, and explore possibilities of ‘conversations’ and collaborations – as well as a free lunch!

Numbers are limited, so please do email m.w.westgarth@leeds.ac.uk to book a place and a lunch (and let us know any dietary preferences etc).

Hope to see you on Tuesday 1st December.

Mark

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Call for Papers – ‘Creating Markets, Collecting Art: Celebrating 250 years of Christie’s’

The commercial art gallery and auction house, arguably the most visible
component of the modern art market, developed ostensibly as a means of
facilitating fiscal transactions, bringing together sellers, buyers,
and objects. But it is impossible, this session argues, to regard these
spaces as purely transactional because they also functioned as spaces
of social-cultural formation and exchange.

Indeed, some of the earliest visual representations of Western European
salesrooms focus on the sociability of these spaces, which were sites
of display for both objects and people. Such images register the
gradual expansion of the art market to serve a broader range of social
classes, but such processes were neither smooth nor uncontested.

Questions concerning the intended audience(s) of the salesroom are
underscored by the history of the built environment of the commercial
art gallery and auction house. The histories of locales and physical
contexts, both exterior and interior, reveal the changing status of
these spaces.

The formation of these spaces and the strategies of display deployed
therein cannot be separated from the objects circulating through these
spaces. What was the dynamic interaction between objects and spaces, as
well as the dynamic interaction between objects and people facilitated
by such spaces?

This structural triad of objects, people, and space was mediated and
activated by speech acts and texts, such as catalogues. These materials
compose the epistemological origins or building blocks of art history.
Therefore, understanding the salesroom as a social-cultural space
shapes our histories of not only the art market but also the discipline
of art history.

This session seeks innovative papers that study the salesroom as a
social-cultural space, establishing arguments on rigorously analyzed
evidence and carefully considered methodological frameworks, eschewing
an anecdotal approach.

The session is part of the symposium “Creating Markets, Collecting Art:
Celebrating 250 years of Christie’s.” It is organized by Christie’s,
London. Paper proposals should be accompanied by a brief biography and
no more than 250 words in length in total (paper abstract and
biography). The abstracts for the session “The Salesroom as
Socio-Cultural Space,”  should be sent to Anne Helmreich:
a.helmreich@tcu.edu (or alhelmreich@gmail.com) and cc.
conference2016@christies.edu.

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The Conversation – Metropolitan Museum NY sell off British Decorative Art

The recent auction sale of British Decorative Art from the Metropolitan Museum, New York at Christie’s (27th October 2015) again draws attention to the relationships between the art market and the museum – see The Conversation

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First of Dealer Archives arriving in Leeds

The first of what we hope are many antique dealer archives arrives in Leeds in early August – the Phillips of Hitchin archives will first be conserved and cleaned before they are catalogued and made available to researchers.

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