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Students on the 2nd year undergraduate module ‘ARTF2069 The Art Market: Moments, Methodologies and Meanings’ were on an art market field trip this week (3rd November).  We had a walking tour of the spaces of the art market of the 18th and 19th century, around Pall Mall, St. James’s and Bond Street.  As well as visits to some leading art dealers such as Philip Mould & Co. and Colnaghi, and of course the auction houses of Christie’s and Sotheby’s.  Here’s one of the two student groups on the field trip outside of Sotheby’s.
A fascinating session on the Digital Art Market at the Association for Art History Annual Conference 6th-8th April 2022 at Goldsmiths, University of London. The Rise (and Rise) of the Digital Art Market Martin Postle, Paul Mellon Centre, mpostle@paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk In recent years the global art trade has experienced a radical transformation, driven to a large extent by digital technology. Across the board, art works are bought and sold online in increasing numbers by a greatly expanded network of individuals and institutions, from international auction houses and art dealers to private individuals operating remotely on shoestring budgets. A leading player in this mass proliferation of internet sales is the UK art market. But this too has changed. Previously, the sale of art in Britain was dominated by seasonal auctions at Christie’s and Sotheby’s, and the selling ‘exhibitions’ mounted by major dealers such as Agnews and Colnaghi, marketed and packaged though the sale of lavishly illustrated catalogues. Now the sales catalogue has been superseded by online publications, available gratis at the click of a button. Literally hundreds of thousands of images can be accessed by anyone, in what might be regarded as a welcome democratisation of the art market. More troubling, with the effective ‘death’ of the printed catalogue, is the all too swift disappearance of images of works of art, as these ephemeral records leave little or no trace, making the establishing and maintenance of pictorial records and provenance increasingly challenging.
Emily Gould, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Art & Law, and a participant in our ‘Historic & Contemporary Issues’ theme workshops in the CSAAM, has let us know of a new online course on Art & Law, developed with participation of the British Antique Dealers’ Association.  The new course runs from 19th to 21st April and will be delivered on Zoom.  More details on the new course can be found at the Institute of Art & Law website – see Here.
We are very pleased to announce a fully-funded PhD Studentship – a collaboration between the University of Leeds and Wellcome Collection, London. ‘Transculturations & Transactions: from ‘curios’ to ‘specimens’, Colonialism, Empire and the role of the art market in the development of the collections of Henry S. Wellcome, 1880-1940’. Details of how to apply for the studentship are available on the White Rose Consortium (WRoCAH) website – Click Here
The UK Has Officially Exited the EU With a Trade Deal. So What Exactly Does It Mean for the Art Business? As one expert says, when it comes to the new trade deal, “the devil will be in the details.” Kate Brown, January 5, 2021 Read the article HERE
British Furniture and Decorative Arts: A New Way of Seeing the Old Join Wolf Burchard, Associate Curator, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Clinton Howell, Clinton Howell Antiques, and Mark Westgarth, Associate Professor in Art History and Museum Studies at the University of Leeds in the UK, in presentations about British Furniture and Decorative Arts, followed by a…
Contemporary & Historic Issues in the Art Market No.5 MONDAY 7th December 2020 – 6.30pm-7.30pm – On ZOOM ‘Museums and the Market: Deaccessioning in the Covid-19 and post-Covid world’ Reports that the Royal Academy were considering selling their famous Michelangelo sculpture, which has been part of their collections since 1830, in order to save 150 jobs under…
A special theatre performance of the now little known, but important stage-play ‘Quinneys’ (1915, The Haymarket, London) at The Witham (Barnard Castle) for one public performance on 28th March 2020. The performance will take place at 7.30pm; a drinks reception will be held from 6.30pm. Re-staging Quinneys’ is part of an AHRC funded Impact and…
AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD Studentship in collaboration with The National Gallery and the University of Leeds The School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds and The National Gallery are pleased to announce a funded PhD studentship for doctoral research, awarded under the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnership…